Cast in Bronze

Combat Control - Air Force Cross Recipients








In the Eye of the Storm

Combat Controllers In Direct Action








Humanitarian Missions

Combat Airmen -Delivering Hope and Relief








Equipment Check

Ready Today - Prepared for Tomorrow

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Prepare Today - Lead Tomorrow - First There

Meet the CCSHF

Preserving the Heritage and History, Documenting the Past and Present for Combat Control Warriors

The Combat Control School Heritage foundation is a North Carolina incorporated 501c3 tax exempt organization, and works in concert with the Combat Control School Staff to acquire, refurbish, exhibit and maintain CCT artifacts accessioned by The CMSgt Alcide S. Benini Heritage Center.

The comprehensive Heritage Center displays lineage, artifacts, and equipment used since the inception of Combat Control Teams. The mission of The Benini Heritage Center (BHC) is to educate Combat Control students, to bolster Combat Control Team morale, and to support United States Air Force recruiting and retention goals for Combat Control Team operators.

From Army Pathfinders to the Air Force Special Operations Command, Combat Controllers have created a legacy that has paved the way for today's Special Tactics Warriors, just as each generation of Combat Controllers paves the way for tomorrow's Special Tactics Warriors.

 < Dedicated to the Preservation of our Warrior Heritage >

Combat ControllerMission One

Facing a gauntlet of qualification challenges, training to become a Combat Controller is intensely intellectual, technically and physically challenging.

The Combat Control School provides the Department of Defense, the Air Force Special Operations Command, and the 24th Special Operations Wing with mission ready Combat Controllers.

Advanced skills training produces the highest quality, air-minded, ground combat warriors in the United States Air Force.  We educate, train, qualify and prepare today's Combat Controllers for the diversity of tomorrow's world-wide missions.

The Tip of the Spear

Leading the way for in-theater combat and humanitarian relief operations, any where and any time, living up to Combat Control creed, "First There".

Combat Controllers are among the most technically qualified and highly trained special operations forces anywhere in the world.

Combat Control Teams deploy to perform reconnaissance, and establish air assault and airfield operations while providing command and control, primary air traffic control operations, and ground and air assault operations in support of counter-terrorism, foreign internal defense, and humanitarian relief operations.

The Battle Field Game Changer

USAF Special Tactics Officer Capt Barry Crawford“…if you asked what tool of the trade would be the very last thing they would leave behind, you might be surprised at the answer. You would likely hear that it is not a tool that makes one nervous when it isn’t there,  but rather a capability that is not organic to a troop of Delta operators or Navy SEALs...

Arguably 'Combat Controllers' are the best-rounded and most uniquely trained operators on the planet. The initial training “pipeline” for an Air Force Special Tactics Squadron Combat Controller costs twice as much time and sweat as does the journey to become a Navy SEAL or Delta operator.
Before their training is complete someone brainwashes these guys into thinking they can climb like Spiderman, swim like Tarzan, and fly like Superman — and then they have to prove they can, if they plan to graduate. And, that is just to get to a place where they can do the job for which they are really trained, calling in those deadly air strikes.

The life of a combat controller is split between working with Delta and SEALs, with a little moonlighting with the 75th Ranger Regiment now and again.  They carry the motto that would be hard to look another operator in the face and say — if it weren’t true   — ‘First There.’

“Bomb Like There Is No Tomorrow” Kill Bin Laden
Dalton Fury, Delta Force Ground Commander
 

Never Give Up

Running the gauntlet and crossing the finish line requires physical readiness, mental maturity, emotional stability and a never-quit, never-give-up attitude.

Get prepared, get selected, never quit...

Videos Links

Related Site Links

These links are a mix of official, un-official and social resources for site visitors to explore.

The CCSHF monitors these sites for changes in content and updates.  If you have a site you would like to see posted here, submit a request through the contact page...

The Alcide Benini Heritage Museum

Help the CCSHF Fund
Combat Control Museum Operations

Help us preserve the History, Heritage
and Legacy for all generations

100% of your donations are applied to supporting and documenting the School and Combat Control Historical Record

 alcide_benini
Alcide Benini, CMSgt, USAF (Ret)
The First Combat Controller
Read the Memorial for the Man who conceived and founded the 1st Combat Control Team

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TODAY - National Airborne Day - 77th Anniversary - August 16, 2107

August 16, 1940 marked the first official Army parachute jump, validating the innovative concept of inserting United States ground combat forces behind a battle line by parachute.
On August 14, 2002 President George W. Bush issued the following proclamation:

The history of airborne forces began after World War I, when Brigadier General William Mitchell first conceived the idea of parachuting troops into combat. Eventually, under the leadership of Major William Lee at Fort Benning, Georgia, members of the Parachute Test Platoon pioneered methods of combat jumping in 1940. In November 1942, members of the 2nd Battalion, 509th Parachute Infantry Regiment, conducted America's first combat jump, leaping from a C-47 aircraft behind enemy lines in North Africa. This strategy revolutionized combat and established airborne forces as a key component of our military.

During World War II, airborne tactics were critical to the success of important missions, including the D-Day invasion at Normandy, the Battle of the Bulge, the invasion of Southern France, and many others. In Korea and Vietnam, airborne soldiers played a critical combat role, as well as in later conflicts and peacekeeping operations, including Panama, Grenada, Desert Storm, Haiti, Somalia, and the Balkans. Most recently, airborne forces were vital to liberating the people of Afghanistan from the repressive and violent Taliban regime; and these soldiers continue to serve proudly around the world in the global coalition against terrorism.

The elite airborne ranks include prestigious groups such as the 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team, "Sky Soldiers," 82nd Airborne Division, "All American," and the "Screaming Eagles" of the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault). Airborne forces have also been represented in the former 11th, 13th, and 17th Airborne Divisions and numerous other Airborne, glider and air assault units and regiments. Paratroopers in the Army's XVIII Airborne Corps, the 75th Infantry (Ranger) Regiment and other Special Forces units conduct swift and effective operations in defense of peace and freedom.

Airborne combat continues to be driven by the bravery and daring spirit of sky soldiers. Often called into action with little notice, these forces have earned an enduring reputation for dedication, excellence, and honor. As we face the challenges of a new era, I encourage all people to recognize the contributions of these courageous soldiers to our Nation and the world.

Now, therefore, I, George W. Bush, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim August 16, 2002, as National Airborne Day. As we commemorate the first official Army parachute jump on August 16, 1940, I encourage all Americans to join me in honoring the thousands of soldiers, past and present, who have served in an airborne capacity. I call upon all citizens to observe this day with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.
In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this fourteenth day of August, in the year of our Lord two thousand two, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and twenty-seventh.
George W. Bush

On August 3, 2009 the Senate recognized National Airborne Day with Senate Resolution 235.
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